Top 5 Feature Films of 2014


Alex / Published on October 16, 2014

2014 is shaping up to be a significant year for great movies and as we swiftly approach the winter months we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to round up our ‘Top 5 Movies of 2014’.

With so many sensational films to select from, this was no easy task and we are certain that we could re-write this list over and over with the number of sensational releases that have graced our screens so far!

However here is our list of some of 2014’s most captivating feature films.


Unlike anything else we have experienced in motion pictures this year what really sets this film apart is the fact it was filmed over twelve years using the same cast. Boyhood is an extraordinary achievement that effectively blurs the lines between film making and anthropology as it charts the twelve years in the life of a young man. Told through the eyes of a child names Mason and starring Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as his patents, Boyhood charts the ups and downs experienced through early childhood whilst transporting us nostalgically through time to truly comprehend the triumphs and tribulations of growing up and of parenting.


Frank explores the story of a young, wannabe musician Jon who find himself inexplicably overwhelmed and out of his depth as he joins an avant-garde pop band led by the enigmatic figure Frank who conceals his identity by wearing a large fake head played by Michael Fassbender. The roots of Frank lie ina newspaper article by Jon Ronson detailing his time as keyboard player in Frank Sidebottom's Oh Blimey Big Band. As themes of insanity and creativity are explored the film offers a unique, comedic and entertaining look at the characteristics of successful artists.

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Brought to us by the fantastic Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel recounts the adventures of M.Gustave, a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel and Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy who becomes his unlikely yet most trusted companion. Just like any other Anderson masterpiece The Grand Budapest Hotel overflows with intricate detail and his signature visuals however this time the style is refreshingly novel as Anderson brings us one of his very best films to date.

Starred Up

‘Starred Up’ is a volatile prison drama written by Jonathan Asser, a one-time poet who used to run therapy sessions with prisoners. Played by up and comer Jack O’Connell, 19 year old Eric is prematurely transferred from a young offenders institute to the same adult prison facility as his estranged father. Eric’s explosive temper find his enemies in both the prison guards and fellow inmates however as he is approached by a volunteer psychotherapist who runs an anger management group for prisoners we see Eric confront his personal demons. A tale of gang politics and prison corruption Starred Up is a must see of 2014.

Gone Girl

Bringing a literary phenomenon to the big screen, David Fincher explores the themes of gender, marriage and media through this surgically precise and mesmerising thriller. The story focuses on the occasion of the fifth wedding anniversary of Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and Amy (Rosamund Pike) as Nick arrives home to discover his wife has gone missing. With a growing media frenzy and pressure from the authorities, Nick attempts to portray the relationship with his wife as a blissful union, however as tension rises this representation beings to fall apart. Soon enough, Nick finds himself at the centre of the investigation as everyone, including us begins to wonder did Nick kill his wife?

So that’s our list of this years must see movies but with so many to choose from what films would make it to your top 5?


Search Tags: Feature Films, Top Films, Films 2014, Top Films 2014, Top 5 Films

Add your Comment No sign in required

  • This will displayed
  • We just want to make sure that you're not a machine, if you don't know the answer you can change the question.
    What is the first letter in the alphabet? Show me a different question
    Choose Answer

1000 characters left.

0 Comment